Daily Archives: April 8, 2019

Mauritania: HDPN Progress Snapshot

Operational Context:

Mauritania is confronted by a wide range of chronic vulnerabilities. Due to food deficit, the country must import 70% percent of its food. Environmental degradation and the adverse effects of climate change affect rural productivity; the country is regularly exposed to acute humanitarian needs, including high levels of food insecurity (often over 25%), as well as malnutrition exceeding the emergency thresholds of 2% SAM and/or 10% MAM. The protracted presence of over 53,000 refugees from Mali compounds the range of humanitarian needs.

I. Shared Vision:

In the spirit of the 2030 Agenda and the World Humanitarian Summit, and in consultation with the Mauritanian government, the UNS in Mauritania has engaged with NGOs and other partners in an integrated planning process that began in 2017. This process provides the basis for a more structured humanitarian-development integration in the Partnership Framework for sustainable Development (CPDD, 2018-2022). Specific reasons for this integration in Mauritania are of two types. First, strategic considerations: Mauritania faces chronic and recurrent vulnerabilities with acute humanitarian needs (in terms of malnutrition and food insecurity for example): these imply a critical need for immediate humanitarian response to assist the most vulnerable. However, a humanitarian response alone is not enough to change the context and “shift from assistance to the elimination of needs”: the integration of a humanitarian / development approach is therefore very necessary. The second basic reason for the integration of the two planning processes is the need to improve the efficiency, also considering the limited human and financial resources available. It is imperative to minimize duplication and maximize efficiency, one of the key indications of the World Summit on Humanitarian Action.

To ensure the impact of development actions on the reduction of vulnerability, it is necessary for the UNS to work with the Government to ensure coherence of policies and programmatic frameworks with the analysis of structural and cyclical risks and vulnerabilities. Any action should focus on strengthening local capacity to reduce direct interventions and parallel systems. This notion implies joint work towards collective achievements and a synergistic use of added value by the different actors.

While sectoral policies, particularly regarding economic growth and human capital development, will address some of the structural causes of the chronic vulnerabilities, coordinated action in disaster and risk management will seek to put in place preventive measures, strengthen national and local preparedness for cyclical shocks. Resilience at the decentralized level (both of communities and institutions) will be supported by these efforts. This will be achieved through accompanying measures to economic empowerment, improved food security conditions, improved access to basic social services, capacity-building activities in different areas, including disaster preparedness and response management. It is essential to ensure more effective coordination in mobilizing resources / sources of funding as well as strengthen partnerships.

Source: Inter-Agency Standing Committee

Mauritania: HDPN Progress Snapshot

Operational Context:

Mauritania is confronted by a wide range of chronic vulnerabilities. Due to food deficit, the country must import 70% percent of its food. Environmental degradation and the adverse effects of climate change affect rural productivity; the country is regularly exposed to acute humanitarian needs, including high levels of food insecurity (often over 25%), as well as malnutrition exceeding the emergency thresholds of 2% SAM and/or 10% MAM. The protracted presence of over 53,000 refugees from Mali compounds the range of humanitarian needs.

I. Shared Vision:

In the spirit of the 2030 Agenda and the World Humanitarian Summit, and in consultation with the Mauritanian government, the UNS in Mauritania has engaged with NGOs and other partners in an integrated planning process that began in 2017. This process provides the basis for a more structured humanitarian-development integration in the Partnership Framework for sustainable Development (CPDD, 2018-2022). Specific reasons for this integration in Mauritania are of two types. First, strategic considerations: Mauritania faces chronic and recurrent vulnerabilities with acute humanitarian needs (in terms of malnutrition and food insecurity for example): these imply a critical need for immediate humanitarian response to assist the most vulnerable. However, a humanitarian response alone is not enough to change the context and “shift from assistance to the elimination of needs”: the integration of a humanitarian / development approach is therefore very necessary. The second basic reason for the integration of the two planning processes is the need to improve the efficiency, also considering the limited human and financial resources available. It is imperative to minimize duplication and maximize efficiency, one of the key indications of the World Summit on Humanitarian Action.

To ensure the impact of development actions on the reduction of vulnerability, it is necessary for the UNS to work with the Government to ensure coherence of policies and programmatic frameworks with the analysis of structural and cyclical risks and vulnerabilities. Any action should focus on strengthening local capacity to reduce direct interventions and parallel systems. This notion implies joint work towards collective achievements and a synergistic use of added value by the different actors.

While sectoral policies, particularly regarding economic growth and human capital development, will address some of the structural causes of the chronic vulnerabilities, coordinated action in disaster and risk management will seek to put in place preventive measures, strengthen national and local preparedness for cyclical shocks. Resilience at the decentralized level (both of communities and institutions) will be supported by these efforts. This will be achieved through accompanying measures to economic empowerment, improved food security conditions, improved access to basic social services, capacity-building activities in different areas, including disaster preparedness and response management. It is essential to ensure more effective coordination in mobilizing resources / sources of funding as well as strengthen partnerships.

Source: Inter-Agency Standing Committee