Daily Archives: February 5, 2019

AACSB Announces 2019 Class of Influential Leaders

Fourth annual Influential Leaders challenge recognizes 33 outstanding business school graduates

TAMPA, Florida, Feb. 5, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Through passionate commitment to sustainability, diversity and inclusion, regional economies, and more, business school graduates make a positive global impact. Today AACSB International (AACSB)—the world’s largest business education alliance—honors 33 such graduates as its 2019 Class of Influential Leaders. An annual initiative, the challenge recognizes notable alumni from AACSB-accredited schools whose inspiring work serves as a model for the next generation of business leaders.

Founded in 1916, AACSB International (AACSB) is the world's largest business education alliance--connecting students, academia, and business. As a nonprofit membership organization AACSB's mission is to foster engagement, accelerate innovation, and amplify impact within business education. With headquarters in North America, the Asia Pacific, and Europe, it is a global association of more than 1,600 institutions and organizations, across 99 countries and territories. Focused on preparing the future with responsible, global leaders through the highest quality of standards in business education, AACSB accredits more than 795 business schools worldwide.

Included among the AACSB 2019 Class of Influential Leaders are the following individuals:

  • Helena Helmersson, COO at H&M group and alumna of Umeå University’s Umeå School of Business, Economics and Statistics
  • Tillmann Henssler, sourcing manager for procurement at Pfizer and graduate of The Open University Business School
  • Richard Hardiman, CEO of RanMarine Technology and graduate of the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business
  • Karim Baalbaki, chairman and managing director of BCI Holding SA and American University of Beirut’s Suliman S. Olayan School of Business alumnus

Each honoree is recognized as a leader or innovator within their industry, a contributor to their community or society, and an inspiration to future business leaders. The stories of how each of the 33 honorees, representing schools in 13 countries, have positively influenced their industries and society are available at aacsb.edu/influential-leaders.

“The diversity of backgrounds, industries, and career paths of the 2019 Class of Influential Leaders demonstrates that AACSB-accredited schools are preparing graduates to succeed as they pursue their passions,” said Thomas R. Robinson, president and CEO of AACSB. “We are honored to recognize these alumni, and the business schools that prepared them, as leading examples of business education as a force for good in the world.”

Now in its fourth year, the Influential Leaders challenge has recognized almost 200 business school graduates for creating lasting impact in business and society. All honorees have earned an undergraduate, graduate, or doctoral degree from one of the more than 800 AACSB-accredited business schools worldwide. For more information on the Influential Leaders challenge, and to view a full list of honorees, visit aacsb.edu/influential-leaders.

About AACSB International
As the world’s largest business education alliance, AACSB International (AACSB) connects educators, students, and business to achieve a common goal: to create the next generation of great leaders. Synonymous with the highest standards of excellence since 1916, AACSB provides quality assurance, business education intelligence, and professional development services to more than 1,600 member organizations and over 800 accredited business schools worldwide. AACSB’s mission is to foster engagement, accelerate innovation, and amplify impact in business education. The global organization has offices located in Tampa, Florida, USA; Amsterdam, the Netherlands; and Singapore. For more information, visit aacsb.edu.

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Central African Republic, Rebel Groups Initial Peace Deal

CAIRO Central African Republic’s government on Tuesday initialed a peace deal with 14 armed groups following unprecedented talks aimed at ending more than five years of conflict.

The agreement represents rare hope for one of the world’s poorest nations, where religious and communal fighting erupted in 2013. Thousands of people have been killed and hundreds of thousands displaced in a conflict that has sent two people to the International Criminal Court.

“The difficult time starts now, and that is implementing the Khartoum Agreement. … This agreement is crucial for peace,” said Herbert Gontran Djono Ahaba, speaking on behalf of the rebels. The talks that began Jan. 24 in Sudan’s capital were the first-ever direct dialogue among the warring parties.

Representatives of the rebels shook hands with President Faustin Archange Touadera and Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir after they initialed the deal.

“Now is the time for us to turn a new page, the page of Central African Republic which has reconciled with itself, in order to preserve its dignity,” Touadera said, adding: “We do not have the right to disappoint.”

Details of the agreement have not been announced. The head of Central African Republic’s government delegation said they will announce them after the formal signing back home in the capital, Bangui. A date has not been set.

“I’m very happy to see this day,” African Union Commission Chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat said. The AU facilitated the talks, supported by the United Nations. “Concessions should be made, and we should all accept each other, and this page should be closed, the page of violence and destruction.”

The fighting has carried the high risk of genocide, the U.N. has warned. The conflict began when predominantly Muslim Seleka rebels seized power in Bangui. Largely Christian anti-Balaka militias fought back. Scores of mosques were burned. Religious leaders were killed. Many Muslims fled the country after mobs decapitated and dismembered some in the streets.

Papal visit

The vicious fighting in a country known more for coups than religious violence was so alarming that Pope Francis made a bold visit in 2015, removing his shoes and bowing his head at the Central Mosque in the last remaining Muslim neighborhood of the capital.

“Together we say ‘no’ to hatred,” the pope said.

The violence has never disappeared, intensifying and spreading last year after a period of relative peace as armed groups battled over lands rich in gold, diamonds and uranium.

Civilians, children targeted

In a grim report last year marking five years of conflict, the U.N. children’s agency said fighters often target civilians rather than each other, attacking health facilities and schools, mosques and churches and camps for displaced people. At least half of the more than 640,000 people displaced are children, it said, and thousands are thought to have joined armed groups, often under pressure.

A majority of Central African Republic’s 2.9 million people urgently need humanitarian support, the Norwegian Refugee Council said last month as the peace talks began.

Last month, the chief of Central African Republic’s soccer federation appeared at the ICC for the first time since he was arrested last year in France on charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes. Patrice-Edouard Ngaissona is accused of leading the anti-Balaka for at least a year early in the fighting.

In November, a Central African Republic militia leader and lawmaker, Alfred Yekatom, made his first ICC appearance, accused of crimes including murder, torture and using child soldiers. He allegedly commanded some 3,000 fighters in a predominantly Christian militia in and around the capital early in the fighting. He was arrested last year after firing gunshots in parliament.

So far, no Seleka fighters have been publicly targeted by the court’s chief prosecutor, Fatou Bensouda.

On Thursday, the U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to extend an arms embargo on Central African Republic for a year but raised the possibility that it could be lifted earlier, as the government has long urged.

Source: Voice of America

UN Sees Poverty Hope in African Uptake of Child Welfare Payments

GENEVA The spread of state welfare for children around Africa has the potential to make a major dent in global poverty, the United Nations said on Wednesday.

Children account for the majority of those around the world in extreme poverty, living on less than $1.90 per day, with half of them in Africa, where social security systems are weak.

Globally, about a third of children are covered by social protection programs, but it ranges from 88 percent in Europe and Central Asia to 16 percent in Africa, said a new study by two U.N. bodies.

The evidence shows clearly that social protection benefits, and cash transfers in particular, have a positive impact on poverty, food security, health and access to education � thus helping to ensure that children can realize their full potential, breaking the vicious cycle of poverty,” it said.

Cash on its own was not a magic bullet and needed to be part of broader policies, supported by other benefits such as school meals, said the study by the International Labor Organization (ILO) and children’s agency UNICEF.

In sub-Saharan Africa, expected to have 90 percent of children in extreme poverty by 2030, 40 out of 48 countries have some form of cash transfer program, but most pay too little and overall only 13.1 percent of children receive them.

“They aren’t all huge programs but it’s been a real growth in the region and it’s moving very, very quickly,” David Stewart, UNICEF’s head of child poverty, told reporters.

Children up to the age of 14 make up 42.9 percent of the population of sub-Saharan Africa, where public spending on child welfare amounts to only 0.7 percent of GDP, compared to 2.5 percent in Europe, which has far fewer children.

Several African countries were to discuss expanding their coverage at a conference in Geneva this week, Stewart said.

Isabel Ortiz, head of social protection at the ILO, said South Africa was making massive progress but still did not offer universal coverage, while Ghana was reallocating fuel subsidies towards child benefits and Zambia was increasing tax on mining, showing some of the options if governments were willing.

“Just saying we don’t have the budget is not good enough,” she said.

The ILO-UNICEF study also warned about the re-emergence of poverty in Europe, where some governments are cutting back child benefits due to austerity.

Source: Voice of America