Daily Archives: October 17, 2018

Tällberg Foundation Announces Winners of the 2018 Eliasson Global Leadership Prizes

To be honored at ITAM in Mexico City on November 15

NEW YORK, Oct. 17, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Today the Tällberg Foundation announced the winners of the 2018 Eliasson Global Leadership Prizes, that are awarded annually for extraordinary leadership—in any field and any country—that is courageous, optimistic dynamic, rooted in universal values and global in application or in aspiration.

The 2018 laureates:

  • Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy; a multi-award winning Pakistani filmmaker, journalist and activist who uses her world-class storytelling skills to focus global audiences on issues that affect marginalized communities with the aim of changing minds and impacting legislation.
  • Rafael Yuste; Professor of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, leading neuroscientist, inspirer of the US Brain Initiative (2013), and a leading advocate to frame cutting edge neuroscience and AI research within an ethical context.
  • Imam Omar Kobine Layama, president of the Central African Islamic Community; Cardinal Dieudonné Nzapalainga, the Archbishop of Bangui; and Nicolas Guérékoyame-Gbangou, president of the Evangelical Alliance of the Central African Republic; founders of the Plateforme des Confessions Religieuses de Centrafrique (PCRC) who seek peace, reconciliation and social cohesion amidst the violence that has plagued their country and region.

“These leaders, working in very different contexts, share a common commitment: to make the world less what it is and at least a little more like what it should be,” said Alan Stoga, Tällberg Foundation chairman. “Taken together, we view this as an incredibly positive and powerful statement about the kinds of leadership we need in the world today,” he continued.

Winners of the Eliasson Global Leadership Prize, originated in 2005 and given in its current form since 2014, are nominated at large through an open, online process and are ultimately selected by a jury of people who themselves are accomplished leaders from a range of countries and disciplines. Each of the three prizes includes a $50,000 honorarium. The Eliasson prizes are generously supported by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF).

“The Eliasson Global Leadership Prize identifies and honors leaders, whose creative, bold and principled leadership is desperately needed today,” said Andreas Dracopoulos, Co-President of the SNF.

This year’s winners will be honored at a public colloquium in Mexico City that is being co-sponsored by the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM), Mexico’s leading non-profit private research university. “We are delighted to welcome these amazing individuals to Mexico, and look forward to the opportunity for our students, faculty and alumni to engage with and learn from them,” said ITAM’s rector, Arturo Fernández.

Jury motivations

The winners were chosen from among 825 nominees from 130 countries and dozens of different occupations, positions and causes. The jury’s selections reflected the following considerations:

  • Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy, filmmaker; because of her increasingly insistent and effective leadership not just in changing minds, but in addressing the facts that create outcomes that should be unacceptable in the 21st century.
  • Rafael Yuste, neuroscientist; because of his vision and leadership in contributing to the pursuit of new understanding of how the brain works, as well as his deep commitment to promoting a global conversation about the ethical implications of rapidly accelerating neuro-technology.
  • Imam Omar Kobine Layama, Cardinal Dieudonné Nzapalainga and Pastor Nicolas Guérékoyame-Gbangou; because they are demonstrating that deeply rooted moral leadership can overcome the divisions of tribe, ethnicity and religious identification in the name of our common humanity.

About the Tällberg Foundation

The Tällberg Foundation, with offices in Stockholm and New York, aims to provoke people to think—and therefore act—differently about the global issues that are shaping their present and their future. For more information, contact prize@tallbergfoundation.org.

www.tallbergfoundation.org

About the Stavros Niarchos Foundation

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation [(SNF)(www.SNF.org)] is one of the world’s leading private, international philanthropic organizations, making grants in the areas of arts and culture, education, health and sports, and social welfare. Since 1996, the Foundation has committed more than $2.6 billion, through more than 4,000 grants to nonprofit organizations in 124 nations around the world.

The SNF funds organizations and projects, worldwide, that aim to achieve a broad, lasting and positive impact, for society at large, and exhibit strong leadership and sound management. The Foundation also supports projects that facilitate the formation of public-private partnerships as an effective means for serving public welfare.

Learn more at www.SNF.org.

About ITAM

ITAM is a private, secular, non-profit Mexican institution of higher education. Its mission is to contribute to the individual’s comprehensive education and to develop a freer, more just, and prosperous society. ITAM offers thirteen undergraduate programs, eleven graduate programs and a full time Ph.D. in Economics.

ITAM’s goal is to prepare and educate men and women that are capable of acting in an informed, rational, responsible, critical way, and committed to creating, managing, and shaping public opinion, institutions, as well as further works.

www.itam.mx/en

 

InMobi Acquires U.S. Based Advertising and Data Company, Pinsight Media

Partnership with former Pinsight parent company, Sprint, will create a U.S. advertising powerhouse

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 17, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — InMobi, a global provider of enterprise platforms for marketers, today announced the acquisition of Pinsight Media, the mobile data and advertising company formerly wholly owned by Sprint. This all-stock deal is part of a broader strategic partnership between InMobi and Sprint across devices, data, media and marketing.

InMobi is a global provider of enterprise platforms for marketers. As a leading technology company, InMobi has been recognized as a 2018 CNBC Disruptor 50 company and as Fast Company's 2018 Most Innovative Companies. For more information, visit inmobi.com

Pinsight Media is a mobile data and brand intelligence company that works with leading U.S. telcos and advertisers across verticals including consumer goods, retail, entertainment and finance. It offers a comprehensive suite of advertising products and services that help businesses uncover new audiences, discover new market opportunities and define more effective customer engagement strategies.

Consumers have very high expectations of how brands engage with them from discovery to purchase and consumption. The acquisition of Pinsight builds on InMobi’s enterprise platforms and enables CMOs to deliver on consumer expectations through improved customer understanding for superior targeting, engagement and retention. By combining network-level mobile data with data from mobile applications and mobile web browsers, InMobi, through the acquisition of PinSight Media, will provide CMOs an integrated end-to-end view of consumers, surpassing other platforms in the industry.

“Sprint’s partnership with InMobi goes beyond this acquisition. We have been looking for a strategic partner that can deliver the latest digital marketing and mobile advertising technologies, besides having a deep appreciation of regulatory, privacy, and data concerns,” said Rob Roy, Chief Digital Officer at Sprint. “This partnership provides Sprint with an innovative partner for driving our marketing success.”

The Pinsight Media acquisition also brings deep insights and a cutting-edge data management platform to the InMobi Marketing Cloud, providing enterprise marketers with a bridge between user behavior and an AI-powered marketing strategy.

“With this acquisition we are creating the most powerful advertising and marketing platform for the U.S. market by unifying online and offline behavior, and providing CMOs with a way to reach and engage consumers, while remaining compliant with privacy and data protection requirements,” said Naveen Tewari, Founder and CEO at InMobi. “This industry-first acquisition allows InMobi and Sprint to work on our respective strengths together, and provides a global template for partnerships between advertising platforms and telcos.”

“InMobi is deeply committed to telco partners and building a unique data ecosystem to support our enterprise platform for marketers,” said Anurakt Jain, VP and GM, Strategic Data Partnerships at InMobi. “The acquisition of Pinsight Media significantly enhances our ability to deliver intelligent consumer insights, audiences  and customer engagement for CMOs.”

As a result of this acquisition, InMobi will expand its operations in North America to Kansas City, alongside San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. This move follows InMobi’s acquisition of AerServ for $90 million earlier this year in January, and its recent partnership with Microsoft in June.

About InMobi

InMobi is a global provider of enterprise platforms for marketers. As a leading technology company, InMobi has been recognized as a 2018 CNBC Disruptor 50 company and as one of Fast Company’s 2018 Most Innovative Companies. For more information, visit inmobi.com.

About Pinsight Media

Pinsight Media is a mobile data and brand intelligence company. Leveraging verified, first-party mobile data from more than 32 million mobile users straight off the network, Pinsight Media works together with businesses and marketers to provide actionable insights that support smarter business and marketing decisions. This includes analyzing key demographic, behavioral and location-based information that can help businesses uncover new audiences, discover new market opportunities or define more effective customer engagement strategies.

Media Contact:
pr@inmobi.com

Logo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/266030/inmobi_logo.jpg

 

US Airstrike Wiped Out Al-Shabab Camp, Intel Officials Say

Somali intelligence officials say the largest U.S. military airstrike against al-Shabab extremists in Somalia in nearly a year largely destroyed a training camp where recruits were preparing to graduate and killed more fighters than the U.S. announced.
Two officials tell The Associated Press that several missiles were fired on Friday by two unmanned U.S. drones.
Some of the freshly trained al-Shabab recruits were “burnt beyond recognition” and the death toll exceeds 75, one official said. The U.S. Africa Command on Tuesday said about 60 extremists had been killed.
The U.S. said the strike was meant to deny the al-Qaida-linked extremist group, the deadliest in sub-Saharan Africa, the ability to reconsolidate. Al-Shabab has several thousands of fighters and has proven to be resilient over the years, carrying out suicide bombings on high-profile targets in the capital, Mogadishu, and other cities as well as more conventional attacks against Somali, U.S. and African Union forces.
Some of the al-Shabab fighters killed in the U.S. airstrike, who had gone through months of training, were being prepared to carry out suicide bombings on Somali and AU bases while others were foot soldiers meant for complex attacks across central and southern Somalia, one of the Somali intelligence officials said.
The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to reporters.
‘Painful blow’
The U.S. airstrike outside the al-Shabab-controlled seaside community of Harardere in Mudug province in Somalia’s central region was the deadliest since one on Nov. 21, 2017, against a camp killed about 100 al-Shabab fighters.
No civilian causalities have been reported in the latest airstrike, which officials say hit only the intended target in a rural area. “Al-Shabab don’t usually trust people nor would they allow them to come closer to their military sites,” one of the Somali officials said.
The strike dealt a “painful blow” to al-Shabab, the officials said.
But the camp’s location far north of the extremist group’s usual strongholds indicates its reach, analysts said.
“A large concentration of Shabab fighters a significant distance from its typical support zone in Jubba River Valley demonstrates the al-Qaida branch’s resilience across the country,” wrote Bill Roggio and Alexandra Gutowski for the Foundation for Defense of Democracies’ Long War Journal.
Somalia on Sunday marked the first anniversary of the worst extremist attack ever in Africa and one of the world’s deadliest since 9/11, a truck bombing in Mogadishu that killed well over 500 people. A U.S. Africa Command spokesman said Friday’s airstrike had no link to the anniversary.
Military presence
The U.S. military has carried out more than two dozen airstrikes, including drone strikes, this year against al-Shabab. The United States has increased its military presence in the long-chaotic Horn of Africa nation since early 2017 to about 500 personnel after President Donald Trump approved expanded military operations.
Al-Shabab, which seeks to establish an Islamic state in Somalia, continues to hold parts of the country’s south and central regions after being chased out of Mogadishu several years ago.
While some observers have questioned the effectiveness of airstrikes by the U.S. and Kenya and raised concerns about civilians being killed, the U.S. military maintains that they “reduce al-Shabab’s ability to plot future attacks, disrupt its leadership networks and degrade its freedom of maneuver within the region.”
Somali forces in the next few years are expected to take over responsibility for the country’s security from an African Union peacekeeping force, which already has started withdrawing hundreds of personnel.
The U.S. says it continues to support that transfer even as some U.S. military officials have joined AU officials and others in expressing concern that Somalia’s forces are not yet ready.

Source: Voice of America

Modified Cotton Could Be Human Food Source After US Green Light

U.S. regulators have cleared the way for farmers to grow a cotton plant genetically modified to make the cottonseed edible for people, a protein-packed potential new food source that could be especially useful in cotton-growing countries beset with malnutrition.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service on Tuesday lifted the regulatory prohibition on cultivation by farmers of the cotton plant, which was developed by Texas A&M University scientists. The plant’s cottonseed cannot be used as food for people or as animal feed yet in the United States because it lacks Food and Drug Administration approval.
Cotton is widely grown around the world, with its fiber used to make textiles and the cottonseed used among other things to feed animals such as cattle and sheep that have multiple stomach chambers. Ordinary cottonseed is unfit for humans and many animals to eat because it contains high levels of gossypol, a toxic chemical.
With financial help from a cotton industry group, scientists led by Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant biotechnologist Keerti Rathore used so-called RNAi, or RNA interference, technology to “silence” a gene, virtually eliminating gossypol from the cottonseed. They left gossypol at natural levels in the rest of the plant because it guards against insects and disease.
“To me, personally, it tastes somewhat like chickpea and it could easily be used to make a tasty hummus,” Rathore said of gossypol-free cottonseed.
After cottonseed oil, which can be used for cooking, is extracted, the remaining high-protein meal from the new cotton plant can find many uses, Rathore said.
It can be turned into flour for use in breads, tortillas and other baked goods and used in protein bars, while whole cottonseed kernels, roasted and salted, can be consumed as a snack or to create a peanut butter type of paste, Rathore added.
If all of the cottonseed currently produced worldwide were used for human nutrition, it could meet the daily protein requirements of about 575 million people, Rathore said.
Other countries would have to give regulatory approval for the new cotton plant to be grown, though U.S. regulatory action often is taken into consideration.
The new cottonseed’s biggest commercial use may be as feed for poultry, swine and farmed aquatic species like fish and shrimp, Rathore said.
Many of the world’s roughly 80 cotton-producing countries, especially in Asia and Africa, have populations that face malnutrition that could be addressed with the new plant, Rathore added.

Source: Voice of America

UN Report: Reproductive Rights Influence Family Size

Family size is closely linked to reproductive rights, according to the State of World Population 2018 report.
The U.N. report says people in developed countries tend to have lower fertility rates because of greater access to family planning services, modern contraceptives and age-appropriate sex education.
The director of the U.N. Population Fund office in Geneva, Monica Ferro, says in places where reproductive rights are constrained, either due to lack of resources or government mandates, people have a limited ability to choose the size of their families.
“Many sub-Saharan African countries, for example, have fertility rates of four or more births per woman,” Ferro said. “At the other end of the spectrum, you have some eastern Asian and European countries with fewer than two births per women. In both cases, individuals face obstacles to the full realization of their reproductive rights.”
The world population is expected to increase by 2.5 billion by 2050, to nearly 10 billion people, with sub-Saharan Africa expected to contribute more than half of that growth.
Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility, Ferro said.
“Women may not have the access to medical services,” she told VOA. “They may not have the access to child care. They may not have access to all the institutional and social support that comes with being ready or being able to plan your fertility.”
To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care, including modern contraceptives and better education.
It also advocates for a change in men’s attitudes toward a woman’s right to choose the number, timing and spacing of children.

Source: Voice of America