Daily Archives: June 7, 2018

Syntonic announces international launch of the Freeway Roaming Service™ for mobile carriers

New service enables operators to accelerate growth in international roaming ARPUs by participating in the US$676 billion generated by online travel services

SEATTLE, June 06, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Syntonic, a mobile platform and services provider, today announced the commercial launch of its international Freeway Roaming Service for mobile carriers.

Syntonic’s Freeway Roaming Service enables mobile carriers to capture new revenue streams from their international roaming subscribers by participating in the US$676 billion generated by online travel transactions.

The Freeway Roaming Service is a white-labeled service that can be branded by mobile carriers and offers data-free access to travel services paid for by app affiliation fees and transaction commissions from consumer purchases. The service enables travel app providers to capture lost transactional opportunities from travelers who turn off their expensive cellular data connection when roaming internationally.

Additionally, the Freeway Roaming Service provides a convenient way for travelers to purchase data roaming packages and micro-data plans to premium apps to further enhance carrier international roaming ARPU.

With the Freeway Roaming Service, international travelers no longer need to turn-off mobile data, wait for uncertain Wi-Fi access, or inconveniently purchase a local SIM. This always-connected international subscriber translates into additional carrier ARPU through participation in the app economy.

The first deployment of the Freeway Roaming Service is with Smart Communications, which will provide their 57.7 million subscribers, when travelling abroad, with sponsored access to mobile apps and content through the RoamFree by Smart® international traveler application, available in the App Store and Google Play Store. The upcoming version of RoamFree, powered by the Freeway technology platform, provides Smart’s international travelers with data-free access to essential and popular travel services such as Agoda, AirBnB, Grab, Uber, Klook, TripAdvisor, ATM Finder, Google Maps, and Groupon.

“This partnership and roaming service rollout with Smart represents an important milestone and the first announced deployment of our Freeway Roaming Service,” said Syntonic founder and CEO Gary Greenbaum. “Along with the revenue-advancing benefits, our technology platform enables mobile carriers to add more value for subscribers, reduce customer churn, and better monetize their roaming services.”

Alice Ramos, Vice President of International Roaming for Smart Communications, commented, “We are proud to be working with Syntonic that shares our zeal in delivering enriching travel experiences for our subscribers.”

“Smart customers already enjoy roaming plans that are simple, easy and affordable, with the power to track usage in real time,” she added. “Now, RoamFree democratizes roaming while allowing Smart to enhance in-trip experiences. With Syntonic, we are expanding our services from roaming access to travel content, further and faster than before.”

For more information, please contact info@syntonic.com.

About Syntonic 
Syntonic Ltd (SYT.ASX) is a Seattle based software company which has developed two mobile technology services: Freeway by Syntonic®, which allows consumers unlimited mobile access to content and applications, supported by paid subscription and sponsorship; and Syntonic DataFlex®, which enables businesses to manage split billing expenses for employees when they use their personal mobile phones for work. Founded in 2013, Syntonic has developed worldwide strategic partnerships with leaders in the mobile ecosystem.

For media enquiries, please contact:

Paul Lonnegren
Pulse8 PR
plonnegren@pulse8pr.com
(720) 470-7488

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/a2baf39d-196c-41ad-ab3b-5d3e36876084

Africans Fleeing War Top List of World’s Most Neglected, Says Charity

Six of the world’s 10 most neglected crises are in Africa, where conflict has uprooted millions of people, the Norwegian Refugee Council said Thursday, attributing the continent’s dominance to a lack of media attention, aid and political will.

Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where years of civil war have led more than 5 million people to flee their homes, topped the NRC’s annual list this year. South Sudan, Burundi, Ethiopia, Central African Republic and Nigeria also featured.

NRC Secretary General Jan Egeland said while Syria is the bloodiest war in the world with millions displaced over the last eight years, it is not considered to be among the most neglected crises as it is receiving global attention.

Conflicts in Africa, he said, were viewed differently.

“Many displaced from these countries do not end up as refugees in the Mediterranean, and are not visible for us in the north � so these crises get too little diplomatic and media attention,” Egeland told reporter.

“Also, some of these conflicts are so protracted � there has been a humanitarian crisis in one way or the other in South Sudan for the last 30 years. So, we have to fight this sense of hopelessness. It can change, and it must change.”

Other countries on the list were Venezuela, Myanmar and Yemen, while the Palestinian territories also featured.

More than 65 million people globally have been uprooted from their homes and forced to seek safety and shelter elsewhere � either inside their countries or as refugees in foreign nations � largely due to violence, says the United Nations.

The U.N. Refugee Agency (UNHCR) said Syria had the most displaced people in 2016, with Colombia, Afghanistan and Iraq also recording large numbers. None of these countries were featured on the list of most neglected displacement crises.

The price of neglect

The NRC examined 24 crises across the world in 2017 and established the list based on the level of political will � between locally armed parties as well as international efforts � such as peace-making efforts to resolve the conflict.

It also monitored the amount of coverage given to the crises by local and foreign media, and examined the amount of humanitarian aid being available by international donors to meet the needs of people who are driven from their homes.

Egeland said the price of neglecting the crises in Africa was being paid by mothers unable to feed their children, youth deprived of education, and entire nations becoming increasingly dependent on emergency aid.

Matthew Clancy, humanitarian policy spokesman for the International Committee of the Red Cross, agreed with the list’s findings and said it was no coincidence most of the countries on the list were affected by conflict.

“While natural disasters often trigger international media attention and funding, protracted conflicts like the Democratic Republic of Congo rarely make the headlines,” he said.

“They are neglected by the international community, despite the fact that violence is fueling a massive humanitarian crisis in which millions are uprooted from their homes.”

Source: Voice of America

South Sudan and Sudan Agree to Repair Damaged Oil Infrastructure

South Sudan said Thursday it had agreed with its northern neighbor Sudan to repair oil infrastructure facilities destroyed by conflict within three months to boost production in Africa’s youngest country.

Michael Makuei Lueth, South Sudan’s information minister, told reporter that officials agreed with their visiting Sudanese counterparts to “evaluate and assess the damage” to South Sudan’s oilfields in the Heglig area in the country’s north.

“There is an agreement between the two oil ministries of the two countries. They agreed to cooperate and work together in order to repair [the damage],” he said.

South Sudan depends virtually entirely on oil sales for its revenue but production has declined since war broke out in the country in 2013.

The oil is shipped to international markets via a pipeline through Sudan.

Fighting was triggered by a political disagreement between President Salva Kiir and his former deputy Riek Machar, and a regionally brokered peace pact failed to end the war after violations by both parties.

Officials from the two countries “agreed that within the period of three months they will repair all the oil blocks and resume oil production in the region,” he said referring to the infrastructure in the oil blocks.

The war has uprooted a quarter of South Sudan’s population of 12 million, ruined the country’s agriculture and battered the economy.

A joint force would also be established by both countries to protect the oilfields from attacks by rebel forces in South Sudan and Sudan.

Source: Voice of America