Daily Archives: April 9, 2018

KERUI Petroleum Wins the Largest UPGN Project in Brazil

BEIJING, April 9, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — In the past few days, the SPE led by Shandong KERUI Petroleum Equipment Limited (hereinafter referred to as “KERUI Petroleum”) has successfully signed with Brazilian Petroleum Corporation (hereinafter referred to as Petrobras) the (UPGN) project worth nearly US$600 million for the gas processing plant in the city of Itaborai in the state of Rio. This is Petrobras’s first public bidding oil project since 2014 and is also the largest natural gas treatment project in Brazil so far. This is of great significance to the development of oil and gas for Petrobras Pre-salt. KERUI Petroleum has become the first and only private enterprise in China to get a Petrobras project in the field of oil engineering. It has set a model for Chinese enterprises to follow on going overseas and creating a golden card of knowledge and expertise representing China.

Li Jinzhang, China’s ambassador in Brazil, said: “We warmly congratulate KERUI Petroleum on the successful bid for the Brazil Itaborai Natural Gas Treatment Plant (UPGN) project, which demonstrates KERUI’s enterprising spirit and relentless efforts in Brazil and represents the important achievements of Chinese know-how entering Brazil. We hope KERUI Petroleum will set up a benchmark for projects on the Sino-Brazilian oil and gas cooperation with first-class design and construction to facilitate local economic and social development.”

Metodo Potencial, a Brazilian engineering company, has successfully delivered nearly a hundred projects for Petrobras to promote local market’s development and support projects over the past three decades. It has formed a joint venture with KERUI Petroleum which plays the leading role on the project. Since January 2017, after officially receiving Petrobras’s project bidding documents, KERUI kept going through 9 months of preparation for the best proposal. KERUI Petroleum eventually stood out among the well-known engineering companies from all over the world, with its multiple advantages of modular and standardized design, reduced operating costs and improved project earnings.

The natural gas treatment plant project, won by KERUI Petroleum, will be the largest natural gas treatment plant in Brazil. It will help the state government of Rio to provide over 2,000 local jobs to address unemployment problems. The plant station is mainly used to deal with the associated gas produced in the process of Pre-salt oil development in the Santos basin, which provides a strong guarantee for the normal production of Pre-salt oil in Brazil and is of great significance to the development and increased production of Pre-salt oil. The completion of the plant station has increased the transportation and processing capacity of natural gas from 23 million cubic meters to 44 million cubic meters per day. In addition, the processed natural gas will be used for vehicles and in the industrial sector, which can greatly alleviate Brazil government’s pressure on natural gas imports.

KERUI Petroleum has promoted the friendship between China and Brazil by its own effort and has extended the value chain of a solid Chinese company to the world. It is the representative of private enterprises in the oil and gas field industry going overseas, taking risks, playing fair and establishing a positive reputation of China on the American continent.

Somaliland Elders Approve ‘Historic’ Law Criminalizing Rape

Rapists in Somaliland face up to 20 years in jail after the breakaway conservative Islamic region passed its first law against rape in a drive to combat gender violence, a senior official said Monday.

The bill, which passed parliament’s upper house Saturday, also criminalizes other forms of gender violence such as forced marriage, trafficking for sexual slavery and sexual harassment.

Ayan Mahamoud, Somaliland’s representative in Britain, said the draft law had been awaiting parliamentary approval for years � and that President Musa Bihi Abdi’s government, which was elected in November, saw curbing sex crimes as a priority.

“This really is a historic law for Somaliland. For the first time, potential rapists will be scared that they will be punished and end up in jail for years,” Mahamoud told Reuters by phone from London.

“It also means that survivors can, at last, seek redressal and have access to justice, instead of being forced to marry their rapists to save the so-called family honor.”

The bill was passed by the lower house in January.

Mahamoud said it was expected to be signed into law by Abdi in the coming weeks.

Until now rape was not defined as a crime in Somaliland, a self-declared republic in the Horn of Africa.

That meant perpetrators faced no penalty. Victims’ families were instead paid off or the victim was forced to marry her rapist to avoid public shame.

Women’s groups said they were encouraged that parliament’s more conservative upper house, known as the House of Elders, had approved the bill with 35 out of 50 votes in favor.

“This bill provides both procedural provisions to support managing sexual offenses and substantive provisions on the punishments of the offenses,” said a statement from Nagaad, a network of 46 women’s organizations in Somaliland.

However, they stressed that the government would need to ensure people knew about the law, and that adequate resources be provided to ensure law enforcement agencies and the judiciary implemented and enforced it.

Somaliland, which has a population of about four million, declared independence from Somalia in 1991 following a bloody civil war, but is not internationally recognized as a country.

Somalia does not have legislation against sexual violence.

Source: Voice of America

Fossil Human Finger from Saudi Desert is 90,000 Years Old

A fossil finger bone dating back about 90,000 years that was unearthed in Saudi Arabia’s Nefud Desert is pointing to what scientists are calling a new understanding of how our species came out of Africa en route to colonizing the world.

Researchers said on Monday the middle bone of an adult’s middle finger found at site called Al Wusta is the oldest Homo sapiens fossil outside of Africa and the immediately adjacent eastern Mediterranean Levant region, as well as the first ancient human fossil from the Arabian peninsula.

While the Nefud Desert is now a veritable sea of sand, it was hospitable when this individual lived – a grasslands teeming with wildlife alongside a freshwater lake.

Our species first appeared in Africa roughly 300,000 years ago. Scientists previously thought Homo sapiens departed Africa in a single, rapid migration some 60,000 years ago, journeying along the coastlines and subsisting on marine resources, said anthropologist Michael Petraglia of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany.

This fossil of an intermediate phalanx bone, 1.2 inches (3.2 cm) long, suggests our species exited Africa far earlier.

“This supports a model not of a single rapid dispersal out of Africa 60,000 years ago, but a much more complicated scenario of migration. And this find, together with other finds in the last few years, suggests … Homo sapiens is moving out of Africa multiple times during many windows of opportunity during the last 100,000 years or so,” Petraglia said.

The discovery also shows these people were moving across the interior of the land, not coastlines, Petraglia added.

Numerous animal fossils were discovered, including hippos, wild cattle, antelopes and ostriches, University of Oxford archeologist Huw Groucutt said. Bite marks on fossilized bones indicated carnivores lived there, too.

Stone tools that hunter-gatherers used also were found.

“The big question now is what became of the ancestors of the population to which the Al Wusta human belonged,” Groucutt said.

“We know that shortly after they lived, the rains failed and the area dried up. Did this population die out? Did it survive further south in Arabia, where even today there are mountainous areas with quite high rainfall and coastal regions which receive monsoonal rains?” Groucutt added. “Or did the drying environment mean that some of these people were ‘pushed’ further into Eurasia, as part of a worldwide colonization?”

The research was published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Source: Voice of America